Electoral College Q&A: What happens if no one obtains a majority (270) of electors?

The Constitution provides two ways that a candidate may be elected President: First, he or she can obtain a majority of electors during the meetings of the Electoral College. There are currently 538 electors, so it takes 270 electors to win an election in this way. This is how we are used to seeing Presidents elected!

But what if no one gets a majority? If no candidate obtains at least 270 electors, then the Constitution provides a back-up election procedure: an election in the House of Representatives. This secondary election process is commonly referred to as the House contingent election.

The last time we held a House contingent election was after the 1824 election, so it’s been a while!

Full article: Electoral College Q&A: What happens if no one obtains a majority (270) of electors? | Tara Ross

Interesting read.

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One response to “Electoral College Q&A: What happens if no one obtains a majority (270) of electors?

  1. Easy! The one that drew the largest crowds. If that doesn’t show who should be POTUS, then nothing does. Perhaps, that’s the way elections should be conducted in the future and allowing only identified citizens in the gate count. And if one wish to show up multiple times–so be it! What’s the difference between that and illegals, the dead, those who assume names, and multiple voters voting. And there are no stolen elections in a massive popularity contest. Just start the kickoff following the last convention–“even Steven.”

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